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Vaccines are recommended for women before, during, and after pregnancy. 

If you are pregnant, an influenza (flu) vaccine is recommended and can be given at any time during pregnancy. Learn how to protect yourself and your baby from the flu.

Vaccination against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (whooping cough) is recommended during each pregnancy, preferably between 27 and 36 weeks of gestation, although the Tdap vaccine may be given at any time during pregnancy. Find answers to your questions on Tdap and whooping cough.

Resources

Cocooning to Protect Your Baby

Family Vaccines: Babies under 6 months of age are too young to have received all doses of vaccines needed to protect them from dangerous diseases. Cocooning is a way to protect babies from catching diseases from the people around them.

Immunization & Pregnancy

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Download this one-page fact sheet to learn about vaccines recommended in pregnancy

Immunizations During Pregnancy

American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP): Learn more about immunizations during pregnancy from healthychildren.org

Immunization for Women Website

The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecologists (ACOG): A comprehensive resource for healthcare professionals and patients containing the most up to date information on immunizations and vaccine-preventable diseases

Influenza Immunization Recommendations During Pregnancy

Family Vaccines: If you are pregnant, influenza (flu) vaccination is your best protection against serious illness from the flu. A flu vaccine can also protect pregnant women, their unborn babies, and even the baby after birth. Learn how to protect yourself and your baby from the flu

It's Time to Think about Immunizations: Talk to your prenatal care provider or ob/gyn

Whyimmunizekids.org: Factsheet about immunizations you should discuss with your prenatal care provider with frequently asked questions

Pregnant Women Need a Flu Shot

National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO): Information on why flu vaccination during pregnancy is so important

Prenatal Care

March of Dimes: Information about important vaccines recommended before pregnancy

Programs to Keep You and Your Baby Healthy

The Vaccines For Children (VFC) program is a federally funded program that provides vaccines at no cost to children from low-income families

Recommended Immunization Schedule for Persons Age 0 through 18 Years

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Tdap Immunization Recommendations for Pregnant Women

Family Vaccines: Tdap vaccination is recommended during each pregnancy, preferably between 27 and 36 weeks of gestation, although it may be given at any time during pregnancy. Find answers to your questions on protecting your baby from Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Pertussis (whooping cough)

Text 4 Baby

National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition: Sign up for text messages, timed for your baby's birth date, through pregnancy, and baby's first birthday

Vaccinations for Pregnant Women

Immunization Action Coalition (IAC) & the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG): Learn about which vaccinations you should have to protect your health when you are pregnant

Vaccines for Pregnant Women

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Learn about the vaccines you need during pregnancy

Vaccines for the Entire Family

Watch NFID's new animated video highlighting the importance of immunization for the entire family

What to Ask Your Healthcare Professional

Don’t be shy to ask your healthcare professional questions about vaccines

  • American Academy of Pediatrics Logo
  • The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Logo
  • Center for Disease Prevention and Control logo
  • National Foundation for Infectious Diseases Logo

National Foundation for Infectious Diseases

7201 Wisconsin Avenue

Suite 750

Bethesda, MD 20814

T: 301.656.0003 | F: 301.907.0878

This site reflects US immunization policy and is not intended to provide medical advice. Contact
a qualified healthcare provider with any questions regarding personal health or medical conditions.

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